Between Giants & Old Stone – Combined Edition

Hi everyone!

Just a quick post to let you know that Ginninderra Press is soon releasing a combined edition of my last two collections between giants and old stone: haiku, senryu & haibun in both digital and print formats.

Right now you can actually pre-order the kindle version for under five dollars – there’s over 100 pages of poetry in there so it’s longer than my usual collections. I’m very excited about this one – here’s the new cover and stay tuned for a print release, which should be around the same time as the June release of the ebook.

Amazon AU
Amazon US
Amazon UK

 

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6 Years, Cripes!

Six years since I registered with (W) – feels like a whirlwind 🙂

Really enjoyed the blog and despite some big patches of low activity, I feel like I’ve put some good stuff out there and hopefully folks have had a good time reading!

Here’s a poem from back in 2009:

 

small town

has an old Esso sign on a tin shed
and someone who used to sell honey
painted yellow on the next one,

at the corner a pink golf ball
towers over the coastline, ridges
like the moon.

in spring flowers grow
round the blue tractor
and dirt collects in the seat

marks on the footpath
don’t fade and the cemetery
never shrinks, only the town around it.

beyond the tennis courts
ghosts shed fingernails and
police sirens skip over fences;

no-one lives down there
where the surf plays dead
and moonlight walks on water.

 

 

Thanks for reading!

 

bone patch

this house is made for
our bones, with grooves where
the right things rest

such as ankles in couch cushions
or invisible targets
for my elbows when I
lean on the kitchen bench
to watch your magic

or the dip in our bed,
where bossy hip bones have
carved out so many dreams
from the old fairy floss
of our mattress

right down to the small bits
left over, like the hair tie
gone missing in the laundry
once a thin python for your wrist.

‘7 Years’ Available Now!

For a little while now I’ve been working with Ginninderra Press on a new release – it’s a small collection for their new series ‘Pocket Poets’ – which features slender chapbooks comprising around 20 poems, with each title featuring a single poet. My entry to the series (#37) is called 7 Years and is something of a mini ‘selected works’.

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For 7 Years I drew out a handful of poems from each of my preexisting collections and included a few uncollected pieces at the end too. It was enormous fun to put together! I love the idea of the Pocket Poets, it’s a great way to sample the work of a poet at an ace price and the neat ‘regular’ envelope size makes it so easy to ship!

7yearsPP

Once again, I’d like to thank Stephen and also Brenda for being so fantastic to work with and putting together a great release!

7 Years (and a lot of other great pocket poet titles) is available for $4 via Paypal at the Ginninderra website or by contacting me right here 🙂

fourW 25 & Writ. Poetry Review

Recently I’ve had a couple of poems appear in two great Australian publications – fourW and Writ. Poetry Review, both jam-packed full of great poetry!

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You can read my poem destined for mud in issue 2 of Writ. Poetry Review, who have what I feel is hands down the best presented online poetry publication I’ve come across in ages. Check it out and see if you agree, I really like the ’tiles’ page. In the issue too, is a heap of other great poets, many of whom I’m proud to call friends (or at the very least co-conspirators in poetry), check out poems by Mark William Jackson, Stuart Barnes, Michele Seminara, Robbie Coburn and Stu Hatton to name but a few!

Subs are open right now for the next issue – you can check out the details right here.

fourW-25-Cover-Image

fourW is celebrating their 25th issue, which is an awesome milestone in and of itself, but it’s also another fantastic one aside from that and I’m particularly happy to be in the journal again this year (check out Tiggy Johnson’s awesome piece in it!)

In fact, I’m especially honoured because editor David Gilbey and the selection panel published each pale song which is a long poem – something rare for me – and what makes their choice of a long poem noteworthy is that for me to have each pale song in the issue, you could say I effectively block two other (single page) poems from appearing in fourW. And I’ve no doubt the editors would have had more great material than they could fit in to #25.

So to publish my three page poem is a great vote of confidence and I really appreciate it!

 

Poem from ‘Old Stone’

old stone - sample

    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    

Next up, planning for this year (2014) will be old stone. Here I want to bring together a collection that features haiku, haibun and senryu, with both more traditional forms and experimental pieces. Not quite gendai haiku style, but hopefully pushing the form a little.

Here’s a piece that should appear:

 

Firenze

beneath the Duomo, cameras mill about like ants. their owners are most dutiful, clicking then looking. inside my skull are painted green and white stripes and when I look back, it’s with some terror. I don’t know if I wanted to go home. the air here is warm, eternal pink, as if trapped in a fairytale. the tourists are so alive, even as they kill the moment with SLR

grand bells
cross the rooftops
our hands meet

 

Poem from ‘Between Giants’

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Skip a year or two and onto 2012 for between giants. My obsession with travel kicks in, though the collection has a wider span of topics of course – but my trip to Italy features heavily. The act of being a tourist features too, something which I still feel conflicted about.

With that in mind – here’s a non-travel one 😀

 

one of the townsfolk

despite our closeness
after all the hours I’ve spent
at its feet
from childhood with sticky fingers
& wide pupils
to today, sneering at it from the couch
but still unable to switch it off
for good,
it waits
making no overtures
from plastic feet,
so still but still so predatory;
the remote, its sly little
Puck
its patience like an old, desert stone
waiting for rain.
it knows I will push, press
& stab at it with lazy fingers
circling
in an almost stoned
fish-bowl dance
& I wonder what the television gives me

not just the pleasant cut-outs
of the sitcom & their dependability
being so utterly unlikely
to change,
nor is it shameful joy
beamed in via predictable
celebrity-failures
or even the news
when all I seem to want is mild weather,
& so if I’m not David
then I’m one of the squashed townsfolk
& I know that whatever resistance
I put up
is hardly going to wrap up a Western
or save planet earth.

 

Poem(s) from ‘Orion Tips the Saucepan’

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On to 2010 with orion tips the saucepan. My first haiku collection! I loved selecting ku for this one and adore the smaller format, it’s so damn neat. I tried to give the collection a loose feel of changing seasonality as you read through, which was tough but fun to arrange.

Here’s a few where I tried to show a transition of seasons:

 

sneaking through the fence
last year’s
blackberry patch

air crisp
beside the road
yellow grass

autumn moon
groan as feet
hit cold tiles

Poem from ‘Stepping Over Seasons’

stepping over seasons cover

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Jumping to 2009, when stepping over seasons came out, I’m struck by big changes in length and theme. I think SOS spans the widest set of topics I’ve written on in a single collection (so far) and I realise, with a bit of sadness, that I haven’t come back to many of them in subsequent releases.

Here’s the opener:

 

other objects

my wedding ring is a plain silver
barrel band. same as dad’s, very modest
and very hard to keep smooth,
with scratches I can’t keep track of and
don’t want to hide. it’s no good pretending
the marriage is perfect, no use
hanging all our memories and every
step of the future on just one symbol. other
objects speak of love, too. the weeping
maple we’ve shifted to every house, the
cup we fill with knives and forks
or the handwritten address you gave me
the night we met, walking the city
and flinging orange peel into hedges, things
that endure, things that have lines
and marks to prove them.