Pigeonholes & Zetetic – Submissions Open

Pidgeonholes-Wide

I wanted to mention two online publications poets & fiction writers should check out Pigeonholes and Zetetic: A Record of Unusual Inquiry.

Both are currently open for subs and you can visit the guidelines via the links above.zetetic

What I love about Zetetic is that they’re looking for unsual work so if you’ve got a piece that just hasn’t quite found a home in other journals, this might be the venue for you. And with Pigeonholes I was pretty thrilled to see this under a special call for subs:

SPECIAL CALL: 90s Mixtape
The end of September will mark the end of our third quarter, and we want to do something special. So, get out your old cassettes and scratched CDs, get nostalgic, and write us some fiction inspired by the bands and songs of the 90s. No literal interpretations of songs – we don’t want an angst-filled tale of woe for a song like “Motorcycle Drive By”, but a story about a steampunk cycle gang that guns down the wrong mark would catch our attention. Be creative. Use a favorite line, song title, or band name. A man who is blind in one of his three eyes, a champagne supernova setting, a tale about irony that isn’t ironic, flash about teen spirit. Don’t be afraid to get speculative! In addition to following our standard Fiction Guidelines below, submissions should include a brief explanation about what inspired the piece. This call is for fiction only, and only has enough room for 10 to 12 “tracks”, so make sure you send your best. Above all, entertain us.

So dig up memories of the 90s and see what you can do!

Spoken Word Opportunity

4779Subs are open for Audacious – an online spoken word journal – and it looks ace, in fact, once I finish this post I’m going to sub a piece as I find spoken poetry a pretty cool challenge.

Check out full guidelines here and ask benjamin@melbournespokenword.com any questions, just be sure to get your sub in before December 19, 2014!

Communion – Subs Open!

communion6

Communion is an online literary journal seeking original solicited and unsolicited essays/memoir (500 words and above), poetry and short fiction (under 1500 words). The journal will be published biannually, around June and December.

Submissions are open year round. Please submit to communion at walleahpress dot com dot au

Check out the full guidelines here and some great poetry from issue one!

A Review & Some Opportunities

Today I wanted to share a couple of opportunities for writers and link to a fantastic review of Stepping Over Seasons, by Sean Wright.

stepping over seasons coverThrilled to read it, not just because he enjoyed the collection, but because as with all reviews, it’s shown me something about my own work that I hadn’t realised. And it’s especially gratifying to hear that the poem ‘Small Town’ rings true!

Here’s the review at Sean’s blog.

 

birsI’m also pleased to announce that I’m back as editor for the poetry section for the 11th issue of Page Seventeen and this year, and as a judge! And so on that note, jump over and have a look at the guidelines – submissions are open now (for fiction & poetry) so get going! 😀

 

regimelogo

Submissions are also open for Regime’s 4th – and this year they’re trying a different structure too – details are right here. The shift includes a wonderful plan to support artists more, while maintaining the high production standards we’ve come to expect from magazine, so check it out – fiction and poetry too.

That’s all for today!

A Haibun & Haiku Update

heron1Today I wanted to share some acceptances and also some submission openings in the haiku/haibun world. Most recently I was lucky enough to have pieces accepted at both Haibun Today and The Heron’s Nest.

First, here’s a winter themed haibun and then a haiku in the opposite season!

Browsing over at the latest Heron’s Nest there’s you’ll find a lot of great haiku – I especially enjoyed this one from Lorin Ford:

last quarter moon—
the scrape of a blade
on the whetstone

and this one from Chad Lee Robinson:

a distant cloud
dragging rain—
the swish of horse tails

It’s also worth checking out the latest issue of A Hundred Gourds – heaps of great haiku, haibun and renku there. This one I love from Raj K. Bose:

storm clouds
not knowing
my future

Submissions for all three journals are open now/closing soon:

ahundredgourds
haibuntoday
theheron’snest

Somnus and the March Hare

Very excited to announce that my short story Somnus and the March Hare has been published by Spark: A Creative Anthology!

Spark‘s second issue has just been released and subs are open for three right now. Possibly my favourite thing about the journal is that it features such a wide range of poetry, fiction and artwork. It’s got variety and quality – what else do we want as readers?

Here’s what founder Brian Lewis has to say about Spark:

My goal was to establish a high-quality, paying market where emerging authors and poets can gain professional experience being published alongside respected instructors and older creative writing alumni who are now established authors. While Spark encourages submissions from alumni of the California State Summer School for the Arts, we are looking for quality writing and artwork from any source. We set the bar high in order to encourage young writers to continue to excel and develop their talents, and to maintain a publication to which established professionals are excited to submit.

I think this is a fantastic goal and really appreciate the opportunity that Brian, Spark (and all publications like Spark) offer writers. I’m also really excited, because the challenge of short fiction is pretty new to me and the support of Spark means a lot.

To get an idea of the contents, visit George Wells, whose fantastic story Patron Saint of the Lowlands also features in Spark or another of my critique partners, C.J. Jessop, who has a fantastic post on Issue I, where she interviews a lot of the writers – have a look right here.

Third Australian Haiku Anthology

pw_banner_bgOne of Australia’s best known haiku publications, paper wasp is a quarterly out of Queensland, Australia, and one which is open to submissions worldwide.

They’ve always published great haiku (and related forms) from not only Australia’s best-known haiku poets but newer writers too, and I’ve been lucky enough to join all of those writers in the Third Australian Haiku Anthology (Eds Jacqui Murray & Katherine Samuelowicz.)

Five of my verses appeared in the collection, two of which I’ve reproduced below:

thirdhaiku

a splash of yellow
standing
against the firestorm

.
autumn moon
groan as feet
hit cold tiles

.

.
But I mostly wanted to share some other favourites from within, and urge haiku writers to submit your work, and in addition, if you’re not already, and you can, to support the publication.

There’s a great range of voices throughout, along with a real reflection of Australian elements that aren’t always readily observable – but then, that’s what I’m looking for in my poetry as a reader, the chance to stop and see something again!

This anthology, and haiku itself, always helps me with that.

Here are just some of my many favourites:

.
bush track
first rain drops roll
dust into balls

Janice M. Bostok

.
.
strutting magpie
opening and closing
the supermarket doors

Belinda Broughton

.
.
rising from prayer
i find myself
in tourist photographs

Ross Clark

.
a squabble of rosellas
unzips
the clouds

Anne Elvey

.
distant thunder
the future
in my bones

Lorin Ford

.
autumn wind
chasing my old hat
old me

Peter Macrow

.

.
Letting my tongue
deeper into
the strawberry sundae

Graham Nunn

.
$5 phone card –
the things
I forgot to say

Vuong Pham

.
winter solstice
the barbed wire fence
furry with frost

Cynthia Rowe

.
mosquito
a stranger’s blood
on my hand

Quendryth Young

Aker Magazine Call for Subs

If you’re a more experimental writer and are keen to have your writing speak for itself, check out Aker Magazine – who’ve just opened submissions and are seeking:

Submissions of high quality stories, poetry, photography, illustration, digital art and anything else beautiful or astounding that you have created. 

We like work that is experimental and powerful. We like work that has voice.

They’re also looking for texts that take advantage of the online format – so are open to work that doesn’t conform to one form only!